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Meet the 11-year-old Girl who Invented an Un-spillable, Un-breakable Cup for her Grandfather with Parkinson's Disease

Wednesday June 11, 2014

Annabel Fenwick Elliott

The Daily Mail Online - An 11-year-old girl has invented an un-breakable, un-spillable cup, which she designed for her grandfather who suffers from Parkinson's disease.

'A few years ago I noticed that my grandpa... was spilling his cup a lot so I had the idea to put legs on [his] cup to make it more stable', explains the bubbly Lily Born, who lives in Chicago, on her Kickstarter promotional video.

The innovative Kangaroo Cup is made from BPA-free plastic, has three legs to lend it stability, an elevated base - 'so you won't get in trouble for not using a coaster', says Lily - and is stackable for easy storage.

'Just because you're a kid, doesn't mean you can't do big and great things', the budding entrepreneur points out. 

Lily has made several modifications to her cup since she first fashioned a rudimentary version for her grandfather out of ceramic a few years ago, when she would have been only nine.

'After working on it for a few years and with lots of help from my dad, we manufactured a ceramic version of the cup and sold them on Kickstarter', Lily says.

While most of her family were by now using the ceramic cups, her young cousin Lana was unable to do so, for fear of dropping and breaking one. 

So the enterprising pre-teen put her thinking hat back on to come up with a new solution.

'I did what any other 11-year-old would do', she quips. 

'I recruited a team of seasoned experts... and got some help from designers and marketers.'

And so the plastic Kangaroo Cup was born. 

'The biggest difference is that these cups are made out of... poly... poly... porcupine...', Lily mumbles.

'Polypropylene', offers an off-camera voice.

'Whatever', Lily retorts, rolling her eyes effusively.

'By my calculations, I'd have to save up my allowance for 125 years to afford it.'

So far, Lily's Kickstarter campaign has raised $16,311 out of a $25,000 goal, with 32 days left on the clock. 

There's no word yet on how much each cup will cost but according to the site, the Kangaroo cup will be ready to ship in October.

Elliott, Annabel Fenwick. (11 June 2014). The Daily Mail Online. Meet the 11-year-old Girl who Invented an Un-spillable, Un-breakable Cup for her Grandfather with Parkinson's Disease. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2650884/Meet-11-YEAR-OLD-girl-invented-spillable-breakable-cup-grandfather-Parkinsons-disease.html

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