News ArchivesRead News

Dispelling Myths about Parkinson's Disease

Sunday November 10, 2013

Craig G. Van Horne

Kentucky Herald-Leader - Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurological disorders, affecting about 1 million Americans. Despite its prevalence and the increased awareness due to celebrities like Michael J. Fox who have Parkinson's, the disease is often misunderstood.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurological condition that affects movement and body functions. Its four primary effects are tremors, rigidity, slow movement and unstable posture.

The disease is caused by the death of neurons deep in the brain, which decreases the level of dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in controlling voluntary movement. Parkinson's generally develops after age of 65, but about 15 percent of patients have a young onset form of the disease that can appear before age 50.

Here are some common myths about Parkinson's and the reality about the disease.

Myth: All individuals with Parkinson's disease have tremors, and tremors are always caused by Parkinson's disease.

Reality: While tremor is the most recognized symptom of Parkinson's disease, many Parkinson's patients do not have tremors but have rigidity and slow movements. Thirty percent of patients do not have tremors at the onset of the disease. Tremors can be caused by many other conditions.

Myth: Parkinson's disease causes individuals to have extra, uncontrolled movements.

Reality: The extra movements — called dyskinesia — associated with Parkinson's disease aren't caused by Parkinson's. They're actually a side effect of the medication used to treat the disease.

Myth: Only one part of the brain, the substantia nigra, is involved in Parkinson's disease.

Reality: The latest findings suggest that Parkinson's disease affects multiple areas of the brain.

Myth: Parkinson's disease is strictly a movement-related disease.

Reality: Because Parkinson's isease affects multiple areas of the brain, it has an array of nonmotor symptoms, including swallowing disturbances, whispering, loss of smell, cognitive difficulties, depression, loss of impulse control, sleeping problems and bladder problems/constipation.

Myth: Parkinson's Disease is caused by genetics.

Reality: There is no known cause of Parkinson's Disease. There seem to be many factors at play, including environmental and genetic factors. Only 5-10 percent of cases have a true genetic link.

Myth: Parkinson's disease is curable.

Reality: There is currently no cure for Parkinson's disease, partly because we still don't understand the causes. We need to further examine the nonmotor symptoms as possible key indicators in identifying causes and cures.

Myth: Medication is the only treatment.

Reality: There are options to treat and manage symptoms. Parkinson's disease patients are initially treated with medication, but over time it becomes less effective. The next line of treatment is deep-brain stimulation, which involves placing electrodes in the brain to regulate abnormal brain impulses. Deep-brain stimulation can be a life-changing therapy to improve quality of life and restore order to an otherwise chaotic world.

Van Horne, C.G. (10 Nov. 2013). Kentucky Herald-Leader. Dispelling Myths about Parkinson's Disease. www.kentucky.com.

Recent News

Oct 12 - Researchers identify immune gene that can prevent Parkinson's disease and dementia
Oct 12 - Blog Post: An Alert, Well-Hydrated Artist in No Acute Distress
Oct 7 - This month, a brain surgery will be broadcast on live TV for the first time ever
Oct 2 - A New Attack on Parkinson's Disease
Oct 2 - Antipsychotics for Parkinson's Psychosis May Be Dangerous
Sep 27 - The beginning of the end? The race for a Parkinson’s cure
Sep 23 - Scientists map Parkinson's spread in brain
Sep 22 - Understanding Parkinson's Disease: An Interview with Jon Palfreman
Sep 22 - Living with Lewy Body Dementia
Sep 21 - Adults with autism likely to develop Parkinson’s disease, says study
Sep 16 - Everyday activity more beneficial than occasional strenuous exercise for Parkinson’s disease
Sep 14 - UNC scientists create smarter immune cells to treat Parkinson's disease
Sep 9 - A newly discovered brain disease may point to something disturbing about Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s
Sep 7 - Treatment for Parkinson's could replace surgery
Sep 4 - Asthma May Influence Risk of Parkinson's Disease
Sep 4 - Researchers Explore Memory Problems Related to Parkinson's
Sep 3 - Press Release: ACADIA Pharmaceuticals Submits New Drug Application for NUPLAZID™ for the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis
Aug 28 - Brain cells 'burn out' in Parkinson's disease
Aug 24 - Study Details Process Involved in Parkinson’s Disease
Aug 24 - Google Reveals Gigantic Ambitions To Fight Cancer, Diabetes, Parkinson's, Heart Problems