NWPF

News ArchivesRead News

Michael J. Fox on Parkinson's and life

Wednesday December 29, 2010

Dr. Sanjay Gupta,

CNN Health - (CNN) -- When I went to Michael J. Fox's neighborhood this morning, I had no idea what time we would start our interview. "He has to time his medications," I was told. "When his medications kick in, he will be ready." As far as I could tell, Fox's medications kicked in right away, and for the next 90 minutes, we talked about everything.

Fox spoke about the hard shoes he has to wear first thing in the morning, because his feet and legs are so stiff. He humorously added that he just puts his toothbrush in his mouth and lets the movement of his head do the rest of the work. As a neurosurgeon, it was fascinating to hear Fox describe his brain surgery with such great clarity and his fears about doing it again. "Well, it is brain surgery...," he said with flourish.

There is a lot we don't know about Parkinson's disease. For starters, no one is sure what causes it. One's genetics likely loads the gun, and something in the environment pulls the trigger. But what?

It might surprise you to know four people on the set of Fox's first television series, "Leo and Me," developed early onset Parkinson's disease. A statistical anomaly, or a clue? Fox and his foundation's scientists aren't sure. The actor paused when I asked him about it, he shrugged his shoulders and said, "I am not as concerned about a few people. I am focused on everyone who has the disease."

And, to that end, he is putting the $200 million his foundation has raised to work. You won't hear as much about stem cells from Fox or the foundation, but he will describe in detail the efforts of a five-year, international biomarker study his foundation is funding.

The goal is to find more clues about the disease, by collecting samples from patients. It is true that most therapies simply mask the symptoms, and Fox said he believes that if they find new targets of the disease, it will greatly accelerate the treatments available.

I asked Fox if he was even sure he had Parkinson's disease. After all, there is no blood test or imaging study. It is just a clinical diagnosis, and Fox's condition was diagnosed at age 30. He has officially had the disease for nearly two decades. Fox told me he's pretty sure he has it, but even today Parkinson's disease is not an exact science.

Fox looked very good this day. He told me he has good days and bad days.

People think of the natural state of Parkinson's as the symptoms of stiffness, tremor and lack of facial expression. When Fox is medicated, it is different. He is smiling, passionate and has constant, fluid movements, instead of rigidity.

"Those are the dyskinesias," he told me. "But it buys me time to do the things I want to do," he added with a characteristic grin.

Recent News

Aug 22 - Parkinson's Disease Could Be Diagnosed Through Eye Check, Mice Help Researchers In Further Study
Aug 22 - Machine learning to unlock Parkinson's disease mystery
Aug 21 - Cognitive control plays major role in Parkinson’s Gait
Aug 15 - 'I've Never Felt Constrained': After Parkinson's Diagnosis, Chestnut Hill Man Turns To Drumming
Aug 11 - Virtual reality and treadmill training could help prevent falls in older adults
Aug 9 - New laboratory model replicates early phase of Parkinson's before onset of motor symptoms
Aug 8 - Marshall University Scientists Develop A New Approach For Parkinson’s Disease Therapy
Aug 5 - Cambuslang woman diagnosed with Parkinson's at 42 is set to trek through Alps
Aug 4 - Active Music Therapy May Be Beneficial in Parkinson's
Aug 1 - Mini-Brains? Scientists Grow Rice Grain-Sized Brains to Aid Parkinson’s Research
Jul 30 - Lab method sheds light on how genetic mutations cause inherited Parkinson's disease
Jul 27 - Indicators of Parkinson's disease risk found in unexpected places
Jul 24 - Parkinson's: Mutant gene interaction may pave the way for new treatments
Jul 22 - Boxing training used to fight against Parkinson's disease
Jul 17 - Stem cell treatment breakthrough could cure Parkinson’s patients
Jul 14 - Cancer drug shows early promise for Parkinson's disease
Jul 13 - Opinion: Dividing the Caregiving Responsibilities Between Siblings
Jul 12 - Researchers make advance in possible treatments for Gaucher, Parkinson’s diseases
Jul 11 - Parkinson’s Head Trauma Link Looks Even Stronger
Jul 7 - Penn students’ start-up XEED puts wearables to work against Parkinson’s disease