NWPF

PD Community Blog

Filtered by: Exercise

Managing the Holiday Blues 2016

Monday December 12, 2016

Many among us will indeed rejoice. Unfortunately many will not. As mental health professionals remind us every year, vulnerable individuals will experience the holiday as stressful, an occasion that activates (or augments) emotions such as sadness, loneliness, feelings of alienation — “the holiday blues.”

Read Article

Book Review - H.O.P.E.: Four Keys to a Better Quality of Life for Parkinson's

Tuesday November 15, 2016

One of the most engaging books about Parkinson’s disease was written by Hal Newsom, a Seattle-based advertising executive. Diagnosed at age 66, he lived with the disease for more than two decades. He was active in the Northwest Parkinson’s Foundation and helped start the annual HOPE Conference®, now in its eleventh year.

Read Article

David Leventhal: Dancer, Teacher, Community Leader, Humanitarian, Movement Specialist

Monday October 31, 2016

WPC 2016 successfully convened over 4000 participants from several nations. Represented were health professionals, scientists, researchers, artists, PwPs, caregivers and families. This diverse community, committed to fight PD, generously shared existing knowledge, reported on recent advances and future directions in treatments, enhanced QOL and the search for a cure. It also inspired and instilled a message of hope.


Among these voices, that of David Leventhal stood out.

Read Article

Rhonda Foulds, Outrunning Parkinson's Disease

Monday October 10, 2016

Superman. Hercules. Rhonda Foulds. Three beings with preternatural strength. But only one of them is real. Real enough to be diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease, back in 1999, at the age of 35. Why does an athlete with Parkinson’s Disease rate a mention with two legendary titans? Superman leaps tall buildings, Hercules dispatched the Hydra, and every day Rhonda Foulds trains for the 10 or so marathons she runs every year.

Read Article

Ten for David

Monday July 25, 2016

On Saturday, June 4, 2016, Peter G. Beidler gave the opening remarks at a seminar on treatment options for Parkinson’s disease at a PD University seminar at Skyline in central Seattle. We asked him if we could publish his remarks in the Parkinson’s Post.

Content Warning: Death with Dignity

[This] is a realistic scenario that many who have Parkinson's or who love someone with Parkinson's will want to read. Some may find it depressing to learn in so much honest detail about what this disease can do to people, and to the families of people, with the disease.

Read Article

Time After Time: Kim Farmer's Story

Thursday July 14, 2016

Kim Farmer didn’t have the time. That’s the only thing he knew for certain when the director of advertising sales for Microsoft’s Bing division fired off an email as the 2015 calendar year wound to a close. With a busy work schedule, a family that included two young children and all the other demands of life, Farmer had pretty much everything she wanted … except for time.

Read Article

The Glass is Half-Full

Thursday June 30, 2016

Ron Hanken will be the family focal point when he participates in his third Team Parkinson’s Walk Seattle on July 30. The event, scheduled to be held at Seattle’s Magnuson Park, is a rare moment for Hanken to move out of the audience and onto the stage.

Read Article

Boxing is cool

Friday April 29, 2016

Boxing is cool. Not just because you can hit the heavy bag, but because we're expected to respect and follow the discipline. And wearing wraps on your hands makes me feel totally [hardcore]!

Read Article

Shaken to the Core

Wednesday April 13, 2016

It’s started. But, I took an extra dose. Oh gosh, they’re looking. Where was I? Now it’s getting worse, because they’re looking. Make it STOP! Telling myself that is NOT working! Now, I’m rambling. I’m just going to close.

“So how did I do on time?” I asked. Out of a 10-minute presentation, “It was 5 minutes.”

Read Article

A Well-Tested Testimonial, or Spin for Parkinson's

Friday February 05, 2016

We all have stories. For those of us affected by Parkinson’s disease, the “beginnings” are especially poignant. Of course, the “middles” and “ends” are significant, too! But that first loss, and gain are determined. Indeed, those first sticky words (either the doctor’s or your own) hang onto the sides of memory a bit longer than the rest.

Read Article
<< Back 1 - 10 of 37 Next >>